A Moonlight Swim


Silver Surfaced

Sea below – a great, wide mirror, surface glazed with shimmering silver – still – crisp – silent. Sky above – a great, wide veil – soft – dark – blank. Magic drifted over those silver-surfaced waters – savouring the atmosphere – filling our souls. I came to the edge of the pale sands and stood in the crystal water – shivers of icy coldness rushing through me. Then I shut my eyes and sunk effortlessly into the still silver coldness of the sea. There was another splash as my mother and brother joined me – the mirror broke – shining silver ripples spreading around us. The water was clearer and more colourless, save for the surface of moonlight, than I have ever seen it before – the many coloured pebbles shone through, glinting in the wet like precious stones. I grasped my mother’s hand and we swam together – the feeling of swimming through that mesh of moonlight and crystal was indescribably calming – and yet it was bracing too – and energising – and when I arose at last out of the chilling beauty of the water I felt fresh, and ready for something – I knew not what.

And I made sure that those special moments of magic should never leave my memory.

This really happened – it was when we were on our holiday in Spain – I will maybe be posting a few more things about days on that holiday – it was lovely.

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Snorkeling

We went to some Spanish beaches in the Caba De Gata last summer (I am writing a book about the holiday called Turquoise Waters) and the snorkeling – especially at a beach called Cala enmedio – was astonishing. Snorkeling is truly an amazing thing. You can spend long hours watching the underwater world; swimming over rocks full of sea anemones and sea urchins, seeing the most brightly coloured fishes swim through the turquoise blueness. Here is a part about snorkelling from one of my stories inspired by the Spanish holiday:

”Parting the turquoise water with her hands, Maggie plunged her face in and looked through into an underwater world where radiant fish swam amid the different shades of blue. Her legs floated up behind her and she was swimming, swimming; swimming with the fishes. Out of the corner of her eye she saw something glinting like tinfoil, and turned in time to watch a shimmering silver shoal flurry past like liquid rushing through a sieve. The shoal swerved – every fish bending itself gracefully in the same instant like one body – and swam away into the blueness. Then a new fish that she had never seen before swum into sight. It was extremely colourful, ever changing colour in the different lights; now it was deep purple, now bright gold, now almost black. Four shimmering bright turquoise stripes were drawn across its body, and its face was patterned with wide turquoise rivers like a map. It also swum away, and Maggie continued with her journey through the water world. After a moment she decided to play a game; picking out one fish brighter in colour and more distinguished looking than the rest she began to follow it through the fields of Poseidon sea grass and between rocks. This one little fish she followed for nearly twenty minutes. As she swam over the rocks, she reached out to touch the streaming yellow and red sea anemones, and felt the tickling, sucking sensation on the tips of her fingers. She fingered also the strange underwater mosses and seaweeds that grew along the rocks, and the spines of dark red and black sea-urchins.”

Most of the paragraph is an accurate description of the snorkeling, with very little enhancing; in fact a few of the amazing things are not mentioned. I really saw the fish with a face like a map (its real is name an Ornate Wrasse), and the shoals of silver fish; and they did look like tinfoil. I also saw the anemones and urchins and played the game of following one fish through the rest.